menu
 About the Center
 Associates
 Grants
 Internships
 Newsletter
 Orion in the Press
 Search the site
 Contact us
 1 Enoch Seminar
 Greenfield Seminar
 Discussion Hour
 PBI Series
 Scrolls Forum
 Scrolls Workshop
 Current Bibliography
 Newly Published Texts
 Bibliography Search New!!
 Bibliography Archive
 DJD List
 Beginner's Guide to the Scrolls
 Orion Publications
 Brill List
 SBL List
 Magnes List
 Dead Sea Scrolls on Line
 Cave Tour
 About the Scrolls
 Scrolls in the News
 g-Megillot
 Email archives
 FAQ
 Author Index
 Scholarly Articles on Line
 Outside Links
 Rock Inscriptions Database
 Orion Center Library
 Israel Museum Scrolls Collection
 Upcoming Symposium
 Most Recent Symposium
 Symposium Gallery
 Past Symposia
 Conferences and Lectures
 Exhibits
 Calls for Papers
 Study Opportunities
 Fellowships, Visiting Scholarships
 Announcements
 Job and Volunteer opportunities
The Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature
Map / Home  


Frequently Asked Questions

Introduction
Who wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls?
What do the Dead Sea Scrolls say about Jesus?
In what languages were the scrolls written?
What are the scrolls made of?
When will more caves be available in the Caves Tour?
Can you send me a copy of the Dead Sea Scrolls?
Can I find pictures or translations of the scrolls on-line?
Where can I see the scrolls on display?
Introduction
As web-master of this site I am often asked questions, which not only concern the the Dead Sea Scrolls, but also the Orion Center's function. This page is dedicated to answering the most frequently asked questions. You may either browse the list of questions and answers using the scroll bar or go directly to a specific question from the drop down menu. If you still have questions concerning the scrolls or the orion center after reading this page then please feel free to contact me


Who wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls?
The manuscripts called the Dead Sea Scrolls represent over 900 separate writings. Some of them were written by the Jewish sectarians who formed the Qumran community. A great many were part of the wealth of literature circulating widely in Judea of the Second Temple period, and were brought to the site by the sectarians. Some of these works, such as 1 Enoch and the Book of Jubilees, we know from other sources as well. Thus, the Qumran documents give us insights, not only into the workings of the Dead Sea sect itself, but also into the wider context and thought-world of Second Temple Judaism.


What do the Dead Sea Scrolls say about Jesus?
This is a common question asked by those not familiar with the dates of the scrolls. The body of literature known as the Dead Sea Scrolls predates the time of Jesus by approximately 80 years and as a consequence of this there are no direct references to his life and teachings.


In what languages were the scrolls written ?
The majority of the scrolls were written in the Hebrew Language (approximately 90-95%) with Assyrian Block script. From this majority there are a few cases in which the scribes used Paleo-Hebrew (see for example 4QPaleoExodus). In addition to the texts found in Hebrew there were also some texts written in Aramaic and Greek.


What are the scrolls made of?
The majority of the scrolls were made from animal skins (parchment) but there were also a few made from papyrus. The major exception to these is the Copper scroll, which as its name suggests, was made from copper.


When will more caves be available in the Caves Tour?
The caves tour is currently undergoing a transformation into the Virtual Qumran Tour. This new zone will be equipped with pictures, video and audio exhibits intended to give the browser a complete Qumran experience. The new site will be designed for both the novice and the scholar. Even those with no special interest in the Dead Sea Scrolls will have much to enjoy from the new site.


Can you send me a copy of the Dead Sea Scrolls?
The Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls is primarily a resource for students and scholars of the Dead Sea Scrolls. We provide a modest reference library for scholars residing in Jerusalem. In addition, our web site offers basic information and links to other sites, which provide a variety of resources for anyone with an interest in the scrolls (including photographs of some of the many scroll fragments). We are not set up to sell or send out texts ourselves, neither are we a lending library. However, the non-biblical manuscripts of the Dead Sea Scrolls are now available in several inexpensive English translations, which may be purchased in local bookstores or through on-line booksellers. C heck out the "Beginners' Guide to the Scrolls" page for authors and titles.


Can I find pictures or translations of the scrolls on-line?
At this time, only isolated scroll photographs (which may or may not be accompanied by translations) are available through the internet; many are accessible through our "Outside Links" page. Some of the photographs now becoming available are associated with Dead Sea Scrolls exhibition web sites; if you run a Google search for a particular scroll (e.g., Dead Sea Psalms Scroll, Isaiah Scroll), such photos will surface. Bear in mind that in most instances (including our own website), the photos are there with copyright restrictions, and if you want to use them, you need to get permission from site owners as well as the original owners or publishers of the photographs (in the case of our site, these are listed under the "Acknowledgements" link). For now, the best source for scrolls photographs are the original scholarly editions, or several recently published CD sets (see http://orion.mscc.huji.ac.il/resources/links.shtml#DSSsoft for a partial listing). These should be available in local university libraries, or at worst, through interlibrary loan. Translations may be easily had from local or on-line booksellers. See the "Beginners Guide" for authors and titles.




Where can I see the scrolls on display?
The majority of the scrolls are on display here in Jerusalem at the Israel National Museum's Shrine of the Book. In addition to this there are also some scroll fragments on display at the University of Chicago.
For information on occasional exhibitions outside of Israel, please see our Bulletin Board and the Israel Museum's website .


TOP


The contents of this site, including the Dead Sea Scrolls Bibliography, are copyright (C) by the Orion Center, Hebrew University, Jerusalem. All rights reserved.